"When you’re at the pool lounging on a beach chair and some little kids are running and the lifeguard screams out “no running” do you respond “excuse, not all of us are running”? No, you don’t. The lifeguard didn’t have to specifically state who they were talking to because you’re intelligent enough to comprehend that the comment wasn’t being directed at you."

Found a quote that shuts down that “not all men” argument pretty well. (via mykicks)

AHaha. haaaa. hh.

(via thefeministbookclub)

worldoflis:

girldwarf:

Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

YAAAAEEESSSSSSS

You know what I like, and feel is so important? That he doesn’t say “Men thinks those are THEIR positions”. He says “We think those are OUR positions.”

As a male feminist, he still doesn’t exclude himself from the group of men.

"

Mansplaining, whitesplaining, richsplaining—the way you can tell someone who’s “privileged” is the unconscious belief that they naturally should take center stage, that whatever they have on their mind they have the right to speak up about, that everyone will listen to them. You know, the trait the Grim Reaper points out is endemic to Americans traveling abroad in Monty Python and the Meaning of Life in a scene that I too often cringingly identify with.

People of privilege making an effort to be better people face a difficult quandary. You get inundated by all these examples and studies and historical anecdotes and moral arguments about the tremendous destructiveness and evil of the sexist or racist system you grew up in. You really want to not be a horrible person.

At the same time, being used to being deferred to and having your opinion listened to and having your feelings matter is very pleasant. Actually giving that up and stepping aside to become the unimportant one for once is very unpleasant, even painful. When you’re used to being in charge you perceive any balancing of the scales as an attack, any leveling of the playing field as something being stolen from you.

"

Power Structure of Oppression

I’m just gonna leave this here, in case anyone thought their fee fees were more important than systematic oppression

Power Structure of Oppression

I’m just gonna leave this here, in case anyone thought their fee fees were more important than systematic oppression

acureforbrainwork:

cosmic-kleptomaniac:

dismantlethefeminism:

I do not understand this “male privilege” bullshit.

What. Fucking. Privileges. Do. Men. Have.???????

Name them. I swear, I challenge you to name these “male privileges” and be able to prove them. 

Come on, I fucking dare you. 

Name them!

Oh boy. Well, as a man, I’ll tell you my male privilege.

  1. My odds of being hired for a job, when competing against female applicants, are probably skewed in my favor. The more prestigious the job, the larger the odds are skewed.
  2. I can be confident in the fact that my co-workers won’t think that I was hired/promoted because of my sex - despite the fact that it’s probably true.
  3. If I ever am promoted when a woman of my peers is better suited for the job, it is because of my sex.
  4. If i ever fail at my job or career, it won’t be seen as a blacklist against my sex’s capabilities.
  5. I am far less likely to face sexual harassment than my female peers.
  6. If I do the same task as a woman, and if the measurement is at all subjective, chances are people will think I did a better job.
  7. If I am a teen or an adult, and I stay out of prison, my odds of getting raped are relatively low.
  8. On average, I’m taught that walking alone after dark by myself is less than dangerous than it is for my female peers.
  9. If I choose not to have children, my masculinity will not be questioned.
  10. If I do have children but I do not provide primary care for them, my masculinity will not be questioned.
  11. If I have children and I do care for them, I’ll be praised even if my care is only marginally competent.
  12. If I have children and a career, no one will think I’m selfish for not staying at home.
  13. If I seek political office, my relationship with my children or who I deem to take care of them will more often not be scrutinized by the press.
  14. My elected representatives are mostly people of my own sex. The more prestigious the position, the more this is true.
  15. When i seek out “the person in charge”, it is likely that they will be someone of my own sex. The higher the position, the more often this is true.
  16. As a child, chances are I am encouraged to be more active and outgoing than my sisters.
  17. As a child, I could choose from an almost infinite variety of children’s media featuring positive, active, non-stereotyped heroes of my own sex. I never had to look for it; male protagonists were (and are) the default.
  18. As a child, chances are I got more teacher attention than girls who raised their hands just as often.
  19. If my day, week or year is going badly, I need not ask of each negative episode or situation whether or not it has sexist overtones. (Nobody’s going to ask if I’m upset because I’m menstruating.)
  20. I can turn on the television or glance at the front page of the newspaper and see people of my own sex widely represented.
  21. If I’m careless with my financial affairs it won’t be attributed to my sex.
  22. If I’m careless with my driving it won’t be attributed to my sex.
  23. I can speak in public to a large group without putting my sex on trial.
  24. Even if I sleep with a lot of women, there is little to no chance that I will be seriously labeled a “slut,” nor is there any male counterpart to “slut-bashing.”
  25. I do not have to worry about the message my wardrobe sends about my sexual availability.
  26. My clothing is typically less expensive and better-constructed than women’s clothing for the same social status. While I have fewer options, my clothes will probably fit better than a woman’s without tailoring.
  27. The grooming regimen expected of me is relatively cheap and consumes little time.
  28. If I buy a new car, chances are I’ll be offered a better price than a woman buying the same car. The same goes for other expensive merchandise.
  29. If I’m not conventionally attractive, the disadvantages are relatively small and easy to ignore.
  30. I can be loud with no fear of being called a shrew. I can be aggressive with no fear of being called a bitch.
  31. I can ask for legal protection from violence that happens mostly to men without being seen as a selfish special interest, since that kind of violence is called “crime” and is a general social concern. (Violence that happens mostly to women is usually called “domestic violence” or “acquaintance rape,” and is seen as a special interest issue.)
  32. I can be confident that the ordinary language of day-to-day existence will always include my sex. “All men are created equal,” mailman, chairman, freshman, he.
  33. My ability to make important decisions and my capability in general will never be questioned depending on what time of the month it is.
  34. I will never be expected to change my name upon marriage or questioned if I don’t change my name.
  35. The decision to hire me will not be based on assumptions about whether or not I might choose to have a family sometime soon.
  36. Every major religion in the world is led primarily by people of my own sex. Even God, in most major religions, is pictured as male.
  37. Most major religions argue that I should be the head of my household, while my wife and children should be subservient to me.
  38. If I have a wife or live-in girlfriend, chances are we’ll divide up household chores so that she does most of the labor, and in particular the most repetitive and unrewarding tasks.
  39. If I have children with my girlfriend or wife, I can expect her to do most of the basic childcare such as changing diapers and feeding.
  40. If I have children with my wife or girlfriend, and it turns out that one of us needs to make career sacrifices to raise the kids, chances are we’ll both assume the career sacrificed should be hers.
  41. Assuming I am heterosexual, magazines, billboards, television, movies, pornography, and virtually all of media is filled with images of scantily-clad women intended to appeal to me sexually. Such images of men exist, but are rarer.
  42. In general, I am under much less pressure to be thin than my female counterparts are. If I am over-weight, I probably suffer fewer social and economic consequences for being fat than over-weight women do.
  43.  If I am heterosexual, it’s incredibly unlikely that I’ll ever be beaten up by a spouse or lover.
  44. Complete strangers generally do not walk up to me on the street and tell me to “smile.”
  45. Sexual harassment on the street virtually never happens to me. I do not need to plot my movements through public space in order to avoid being sexually harassed, or to mitigate sexual harassment.
  46. On average, I am not interrupted by women as often as women are interrupted by men.
  47. On average, I will have the privilege of not knowing about my male privilege.

And lastly, I am taken as a more credible feminist than my female peers, despite the fact that the feminist movement is not liberating to my sex.

This is male privilege.

 

THIS. THIS IS HOW YOU BE A MALE FEMINIST. 

wow-suchbree-veryblog:

"If white people are so privileged why is there a Black Entertainment Network and no White Entertainment Network?"

"Men don’t have privilege, there are women’s only gyms!"

"Why isn’t there a campus centre for straight/cis people!?"

SAME REASONS WHY IN MARIO KART YOU DON’T GET BLUE SHELLS OR LIGHTNING BOLTS WHEN YOU’RE ALREADY IN FIRST PLACE, ASSBAG.

feels-like-fire:

meganphntmgrl:

I’m starting to think that instead of vampires as a metaphor for oppressed people, we really need to start using vampirism as a metaphor for privilege.

Like, yes, you’re a vampire and you probably can’t help that, and sometimes people will freak the fuck out when you’re coming at them even if it’s just to ask if you can borrow a cup of sugar for your blood muffins or something, and you’re like, “Hey, don’t judge me just because I’m a vampire!”

And then a human’s like, “Um, well, historically, vampires tend to attack us humans and drink our blood.”

And sure, your first instinct is to go “Hey, I’m one of the good vampires! I have a subscription service at a blood bank and everything!”, but… that… doesn’t change the fact that historically, yeah, vampires have survived by eating humans. Any changing perception of vampires is going to have to start with vampires.

So instead of protesting your innocence, you have to start by going to find other vampires and being like “Hey guys, we have to stop eating humans.”

And unfortunately, a lot of vampires are gonna think they’re already doing everything they need to to be Good Vampires, and this needs to be combatted. Being a Good Vampire is a never-ending struggle, and it’s not very rewarding, but it’s what has to be done.

And some humans will never, ever stop being suspicious of you, and you’ll have to accept that. Humans don’t owe you their respect just because you’re doing them the basic service of not flapping into their bedrooms at night and biting their necks. That’s like, the bare minimum of not being an asshole vampire. And some humans will probably still make jokes about how vampires can’t go in the sun without burning up and how they have no reflections and how for some reason they think “Alucard” is actually a cute baby name, but you’ll just have to deal with that, because they’re coping with the fact that this is an entire population of things that historically have always eaten them.

But it’s not about you. It’s about making the world safer for humans, and combatting it every damn time you see another vampire planning out a good old-fashioned round of feasting on virgins in nightgowns, and saying “Okay, no, that’s really offensive” the next time one of your vampire buddies refers to a human as a bloodbag, and generally working overtime to present a pro-human standpoint.

Because really, what good does it do to make the monsters the oppressed ones?

Lit nerd here! I took a class on vampires in undergraduate, and went on to take lots of other classes on the macabre, the gothic, the theme of monsters in literature, etc. Over the course of my undergraduate career, I wound up reading “Dracula” as assigned reading 3 separate times, so I’m awfully familiar with the book. If you’ve never read it, it’s definitely worth a read, as it’s short, and also one of the most famous epistolary novels ever written; if you need an example of that art form, you won’t find a better one than “Dracula.” (An epistolary novel is a work written as a series of documents—say, letters from one character to another, or supposed journal entries, that kind of thing.) Although one of the genre’s best examples, Dracula was NOT the first modern, fictional vampire—that title goes to John William Polidori, who wrote "The Vampyre" in 1819. (The short story was often attributed erroneously to Lord Byron, on whom the titular character was loosely based.)

I love this essay. Hilariously, despite the recent turn some vampires have taken in culture (I haven’t read the Twilight series, and I’m not familiar with any iteration of True Blood)—-vampires were never meant to read as oppressed, at least as they appear in works of fiction, as opposed to Eastern European folklore. They were ALWAYS meant as a metaphor for the following things: the aristocracy (Dracula in the novel being the classic example, although the vampire Lestat as an actual rock star is a pretty stellar example as well), invading foreigners & how they’ll ruin ~our~ culture (xenophobia was alive and well in Bram Stoker’s writing), fear of germs/contagion (international travel had already brought a series of dangerous diseases to British soil, including repeated waves of cholera epidemic), and a few other things. But all the people who defeat Dracula are meant to represent the good things about the “common man”: faith in God, sensible thinking, a reliance on scientific thinking and new technology to drive out ancient folkloric wickedness—a metaphorical triumph of science (common man, things accessible to everyone) over corrupt power and dark magic (obtained via privilege, accessible only to the aristocracy).

Lots of other vampire stories, particularly from this time period (late 1890s, early 1900s) carry this out, as well as some other novels with similar themes—like “The Picture of Dorian Grey.” Always, the privileged person appears unnaturally beautiful and powerful, usually at the cost of countless hidden deaths of common people or other wickedness, and is often ageless too; almost always, the privileged person acts alone, as opposed to working in groups. (Vampire covens are a more modern addendum to the story.) Even if there is more than one vampire, it’s always a privileged minority into which one must be invited—you can never become a vampire by simple hard work; you have to be chosen. (A great fictional metaphor for the troubles of the common man/peasant class is actually the trope of the werewolf, but that’s a subject for another essay.)

Last thing: Interestingly, in Eastern European/Slavic folk lore, vampires weren’t nearly as evil as they wound up portrayed in fiction. They didn’t have fangs, and they didn’t necessarily drink blood; instead of being pasty or white-skinned, they were usually ruddy in color; they often had no neck; and they were blamed for everything from illness, to crops dying, to sick farm animals, to money troubles, to the weather. And if you wound up a vampire, it was usually an accident: you died in a liminal period of life (like an unwed pregnant woman, or a soldier in battle) … or sometimes it was just as simple as a black cat jumping over your body before you’d been buried properly. At any rate, being a vampire was an unlucky fate, but it didn’t mean your soul was cursed or you were doomed to never make it to heaven or the afterlife—more like you had just gotten stuck en route. 

meganphntmgrl:

I’m starting to think that instead of vampires as a metaphor for oppressed people, we really need to start using vampirism as a metaphor for privilege.

Like, yes, you’re a vampire and you probably can’t help that, and sometimes people will freak the fuck out when you’re coming at them even if it’s just to ask if you can borrow a cup of sugar for your blood muffins or something, and you’re like, “Hey, don’t judge me just because I’m a vampire!”

And then a human’s like, “Um, well, historically, vampires tend to attack us humans and drink our blood.”

And sure, your first instinct is to go “Hey, I’m one of the good vampires! I have a subscription service at a blood bank and everything!”, but… that… doesn’t change the fact that historically, yeah, vampires have survived by eating humans. Any changing perception of vampires is going to have to start with vampires.

So instead of protesting your innocence, you have to start by going to find other vampires and being like “Hey guys, we have to stop eating humans.”

And unfortunately, a lot of vampires are gonna think they’re already doing everything they need to to be Good Vampires, and this needs to be combatted. Being a Good Vampire is a never-ending struggle, and it’s not very rewarding, but it’s what has to be done.

And some humans will never, ever stop being suspicious of you, and you’ll have to accept that. Humans don’t owe you their respect just because you’re doing them the basic service of not flapping into their bedrooms at night and biting their necks. That’s like, the bare minimum of not being an asshole vampire. And some humans will probably still make jokes about how vampires can’t go in the sun without burning up and how they have no reflections and how for some reason they think “Alucard” is actually a cute baby name, but you’ll just have to deal with that, because they’re coping with the fact that this is an entire population of things that historically have always eaten them.

But it’s not about you. It’s about making the world safer for humans, and combatting it every damn time you see another vampire planning out a good old-fashioned round of feasting on virgins in nightgowns, and saying “Okay, no, that’s really offensive” the next time one of your vampire buddies refers to a human as a bloodbag, and generally working overtime to present a pro-human standpoint.

Because really, what good does it do to make the monsters the oppressed ones?

"Black women wake up in the morning, look in the mirror, and see Black women. White women wake up in the morning, look in the mirror, and see women. White men wake up in the morning, look in the mirror, and see human beings."
Michelle Haimoff, on privilege (via jatigi)

lizawithazed:

charliebink:

What shape are you?

privilege in a simple cartoon

windatyourfeels:

postmoderndepression:

dashdotdashbackslash:

moniquill:

jadelyn:

climbing-the-holy-mountain:

redisthegoatgod:

oldblueeyes:

Alan Watts: What if money was no object? (x)

Well this is the most relevant thing right now.

What if fear was no emotion.

What if hopes and dreams could pay the fucking bills?

What if you didn’t have to worry about this nagging little feeling called survival instinct that tells you you need a place to stay and food to eat and both of those cost money?

What if you were guaranteed not to have dependents or anyone else for whom you must provide?

This is yet some more of that well-meaning upper-middle-class-white-dude bullshit.  Like that quote about birds being able to fly anywhere and how awesome…but if you think about it, so can we.  No.  We can’t.  Well, some of us can, but that’s a very small minority of the overall population.  

Sure, it’d be fantastic to be able to say “Fuck that whole making-money thing, I’m going to Art!” and follow through on that.  But you do that in the real world, before too long you’ll be fucking homeless, and then how are you going to do your art?

This kind of mentality acts like people who work regular boring 9-5 jobs to pay the bills do nothing BUT work those mind-numbing jobs.  Like we don’t get off work and do other things.  Like we don’t spend our weekends on anything.  ”You’re just going to do things you don’t like doing in order to go on living, in order to continue doing things you don’t like doing.”  JFC, dude.  What a bullshit all-or-nothing attitude.  The choices aren’t “spend every waking second like a hamster on a soul-sucking treadmill” or “LIVE YOUR DREAMS AND BE FREEEEE!”  You do what you have to do, in order to enable yourself to do the things you want to do.  I spend 40 hours a week being Assistant of Operations for an insurance company so that I can afford, as well as food and gas and whatnot, the raw materials for my jewelry, my computer and ergo keyboard on which to write, video games to play, etc.  That’s how it works.  Unless you’re independently wealthy, you cannot afford to invest the amount of time it takes to become a “master” at your passion to the point where you *can* start making money from it.  My dad makes $168k a year as a corporate pilot, because his uncle paid for his flight school and my mother supported them both while Dad was spending his time doing shit work to build hours so he could get hired for a real job.

He, like Alan Watts and so many other well-off people, talks a lot of shit about doing what you love.  What he, like Alan Watts and so many other well-off people, seems to forget is that the ability to support oneself with one’s passion did not materialize out of thin air.  

Not to mention that, until we reach the point of a fully-automated robotic society, there will never be a way in which *everyone* can follow their passion.  There are not enough people in the world whose true passion is for collecting garbage or scrubbing toilets or waiting tables, to support the rest of the passion-pursuing populace.  Period.  Until we have automated systems and machinery to do all of that, there will always be people stuck doing shit work to survive.  That’s how the system is designed.

So on top of the absurdity of it, advocating this kind of blithe Follow Your Dreams attitude is classist and, given the way that class and socioeconomic realities play out in this culture, racist.  This message tries to liberate well-off white college kids at the expense of their less-white, less-well-off peers.  

“Forget the money” is something you will only ever hear from the lips of those who can already afford to forget the fucking money.

reblogging for commentary

I’m walking around my tiny little shit-basement-room/apartment, looking at job ads for the same jobs I left to go be to school to get away from but are the only thing out there that will pay the bills. Every so often, I think of this commentary, and break out in a slow clap. 

THANK YOU. I was so tired of seeing this on my dash, I appreciate you picking it apart more eloquently than I could.

Reblogging for commentary.