nowyoukno:

Now You Know useful websites:
pipl.com - a search engine for finding people.
privnote.com - write a note to someone that
will self-destruct after they read it.
recipepuppy.com - search for recipes based
on the ingredients you have.
thefuckingweather.com - a more profane look
at the weather.
wolframalpha.com - a computational knowledge
engine.
wikirhymer.com - an online rhyming dictionary.
unlistmy.info - find out which websites store
data about you, and tell them to unlist your info.
thistothat.com - find out the best way to glue
this to that.
and daily facts here!

nowyoukno:

Now You Know useful websites:

anatomicalart:

gorankun:

Wrist, Hand & Finger Stretching Routine. For those tired artsy hands! When it already hurts to draw (or write), we should stop for a moment and then stretch + rest our hands.

I’m gonna take a break and do this for a moment.

Very good for artists to do regularly. Doing these exercises regularly helps prevent long term issues like arthritis and carpal tunnel.

illesigns:

Pixars 22 Rules of Story Telling

illesigns:

Pixars 22 Rules of Story Telling

masterofsporks:

smilelikeyougotnothingtolose:

underscorex:

mma-gifs:

Sport Science S02E11: World’s Toughest Woman (June/21/2009)

"Gina can land all 8 blows in a blistering 3 seconds. And how much does this maelstrom combine to generate? An amazing 4,800 pounds of force. That’s like a North Pacific giant octopus pounding you with all 8 of it’s arms. Translation: In 3 seconds, Gina could brake your ribs, give you a concussion, shatter your nose, rupture your spleen, cause internal bleeding, and put you down for the count."

but women can’t be superheroes

Hey it’s Gina Carano.

Art reference. Ooooh

octoswan:

I made these as a way to compile all the geographical vocabulary that I thought was useful and interesting for writers. Some descriptors share categories, and some are simplified, but for the most part everything is in its proper place. Not all the words are as useable as others, and some might take tricky wording to pull off, but I hope these prove useful to all you writers out there!

(save the images to zoom in on the pics)

Two layouts of 221B Baker Street, published in the last issue of The Strand Magazine, March 1950.

gallifrey-feels:

221bitssmallerontheoutside:

Knife Blade

I’m a writer not a murderer

*I’m a cook not a murderer

perplexingly:

There’s always space for yet another armor tutorial, right? (ノ´ヮ´)ノ*:・゚✧

Note that the armor I drew would be worn around 15th century, the more into the future the less and less components knight’s armor had (i. e. in early 14th century instead of greaves a knight would wear long boots only; in 12th century knights didn’t wear plate breastplates and instead a chain mail only). Also the design of armor pattern changed by year and was different in every country (i.e. in eastern Europe armors, while still looking European, were heavily influenced by Turkey). so just make sure you always do research whenever drawing an armor. And one more thing to keep in mind is that armors were expensive, knights wearing a full plate armor weren’t an often sight.

Some links that may be useful:

randomhouse:

Servicey!

randomhouse:

Servicey!

Claire’s fancy-pants HISTORICAL FASHION MASTER POST

shoomlah:

image

So my historical costuming resources list from 2011 was less than a page long- I’m not saying that I’ve learned a lot in the past three years, but this list is now sitting pretty at a solid nine pages.  Whew.  And people wonder why I want to redo this damn series.

This list is by no means an exhaustive one- it’s a list of (primarily western) historical fashion resources, both online and offline, that is limited to what I know, own, or use!  It’s a work in progress, and I’m definitely hoping to expand on it as my knowledge base grows.  First things first, how about a little:

ADVICE FOR RESEARCHING HISTORICAL FASHION

  • Read, and read about more than just costuming.  Allowing yourself to understand the cultural and historical context surrounding the clothing of a particular region/period can be invaluable in sussing out good costume design.  Looking at pictures is all well and good, but reading about societal pressures, about construction techniques, daily routines, local symbolism, whatever else will really help you understand the rhyme and reason behind costuming from any given context.
  • Expand your costume vocabulary.  When you’re delving into a new topic, costuming or otherwise, picking up new terminology is essential to proper understanding and furthering your research.  Write down or take note of terms as you come across them- google them, look up synonyms, and use those words as a jumping off point for more research.  What’s a wire rebato?  How does it differ from a supportasse?  Inquiring minds want to know.
  • Double-check your sources.  Especially on the internet, and double especially on tumblr.  I love it, but it’s ground zero for rapidly spreading misinformation.  Books are usually your safest bet, but also take into account their date of publication, who’s writing them- an author’s biases can severely mangle their original source material.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help.  Do everything you can to find out information on your own, but feel free to reach out to people with more specialized areas of knowledge for help!  Be considerate about it- the people you’re asking are busy as well- but a specific line of questioning that proves you’re passionate and that you respect their subject matter expertise can work wonders.

Okay, onto the links!

image

It’s impossible to overstate the importance of getting off the internet and looking into books!  God bless the internet, but books are (generally, this isn’t a rule) better-researched and better-sourced.  Bibliographies also mean each individual books can be a jumping off point for further research, which is always a fantastic thing.

Remember- owning books is awesome and you should absolutely assemble your own library of resources, but LIBRARIES.  Libraries.  You’ll be surprised to find what books are available to you at your local library.

GENERAL / SURVEYS

Patterns fo Fashion books
Detailed, hand-drawn diagrams of historical fashion, inside and out.  Pretty amazing stuff.

Fashion in Detail books
Not what you want if you’re looking for photos of entire costumes- note the “in detail” bit up there.  Just a beautiful series, and great reference for all the little things you might miss otherwise.  The V&A has an amazing fashion collection, and it’s great to see them share it with the world.

image

Read More